FoodLegal launches new series of intensive workshops

  • March 21, 2013

Leading food compliance consultants FoodLegal today announced a new program of intensive workshops. Bookings for the half day intensive workshops to be run in both Sydney and Melbourne began today.

Registration forms are available here.

There are two separate courses:

1. FoodLegal’s  ‘Swim between the flags’ workshop on marketing principles of compliance with Australian Consumer Law.

One session each in Sydney and Melbourne

Fri 24th May:  The RACV Club, 8.45am-1pm , 501 Bourke St, Melbourne

Mon 27th May: The Menzies Hotel, 8.45am-1pm, 14 Carrington St, Sydney

 

2. FoodLegal’s ‘Navigating the new health claims standard’ workshop

Choose one of the following:

Tues 28th May: The Menzies Hotel, 8.45am-1pm, 14 Carrington St, Sydney

Wed 29th May: The Menzies Hotel, 8.45am-1pm, 14 Carrington St, Sydney

Fri 31st May: The RACV Club, 8.45am-1pm , 501 Bourke St, Melbourne

FoodLegal’s ‘Swim between the flags’ workshop covers the best practices to identify when and how a non-compliance risk exists in any food marketing campaign under Australian Consumer Law legislation and what options can be considered.

FoodLegal’s ‘Navigating the new Health Claims Standard’ workshop is being offered again in response to high demand which exceeded capacity for their earlier (February) workshop.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT EACH COURSE :

1. FoodLegal’s  ‘Swim between the flags’ workshop on marketing principles of compliance with Australian Consumer Law.

This course is concerned with the many challenges to marketing professionals and product developers working in the food industry. It provides a multitude of  examples and illustrations showing marketing non-compliance risks in relation to food marketing, and food claims, and food descriptors, and campaigns that have not thought about legal consequences. The course is intended to help participants identify the risks and to know when Australian Consumer Law issues are likely to arise. It will explain when wording used in many marketing claims may need to be modified, and associated issues such as substantiation of claims and principles to follow in marketing, packaging, social media and other promotional activities.

FoodLegal’s intensive workshop will help participants answer such questions as:

  • When is there likely to be a risk of ‘misleading conduct’ and ‘misrepresentation’?
  • What can I say regarding a particular standard, quality or grade of product?
  • When is wording in any marketing blurb not to be taken literally but when do other similar words create a legal risk exposure?
  • What are the different rules for someone giving an ‘endorsement’ as against a ‘sponsorship’?
  • What are the rules and benefits that can be gained from consumer surveys?
  • What do I need to consider when designing free offers?
  • What product descriptions or claims are more likely to create additional non-compliance risks?
  • What are the rules for various environmental claims or some claims that border on nutritional or health claims?
  • How do the principles for the ACL compliance fit in with the requirements of similar food standards , or vice versa?

2. FoodLegal’s ‘Navigating the new health claims standard’ workshop

In January 2013, a new Health Claims Standard was introduced into the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code.

This workshop will cover:

  • How the new Health Claims Standard will apply to your products and marketing campaigns;
  • How the new Health Claims Standard will interact with other laws such as the Australian Consumer Law and the Therapeutic Goods Act;
  • How to substantiate health claims that have not been FSANZ pre-approved;
  • Methodological approaches for Health Claims;
  • Alternative marketing methods in light of the new Health Claims Standard;

FoodLegal says the intensive workshop will help participants answer such questions as:

  • Is it a nutrition claim or a general level health claim?
  • Can I claim to be “<…> free” anymore?
  • What can I say about fats?
  • What about innovative/novel substances?
  • What about sodium reduction claims?
  • When can I use a health-related endorsement?
  • What can be said in relation to “slimming” or “weight loss” problems?
  • What if my product does not meet the profiling criterion? What opportunities are there for me?

Registration forms are available here.


Bookmarks

Reader Comments

Australian Food News reserves the right to edit or not publish comments of a potentially offensive or defamatory nature. Comments will not be published if name and email address has not been provided (name and email will be withheld if requested).

The opinions expressed below are those of Australian Food News readers and do not necessarily reflect those of Australian Food News.